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Sun, 26 Apr 2015 11:26:37 -0400

Marisa Eve GirawongA Google executive-turned-mountain climber and a New Jersey doctor working at a Mount Everest base camp were among three Americans killed in Saturday’s devastating earthquake in Nepal.


Sun, 26 Apr 2015 13:24:07 -0400

Indian soldiers, left, on rescue mission to Nepal rush to board an Indian Air Force aircraft near New Delhi, India, Sunday, April 26, 2015. A strong magnitude-7.9 earthquake shook Nepal's capital and the densely populated Kathmandu Valley before noon Saturday, causing extensive damage with toppled walls and collapsed buildings, officials said.(AP Photo/Altaf Qadri)An aftershock adds chaos to an already devastated region.


Sun, 26 Apr 2015 05:02:28 -0400

President Barack Obama, left, brings out actor Keegan-Michael Key from Key & Peele to play the part of "Luther, President Obama’s anger translator" during his remarks at the White House Correspondents' Association dinner at the Washington Hilton on Saturday, April 25, 2015, in Washington. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci)WASHINGTON (AP) — A presidential election just getting into gear provided President Barack Obama plenty of new material to work with on the night he describes as Washington celebrating itself.


Sun, 26 Apr 2015 15:12:23 -0400

A demonstrator confronts police near Camden Yards during a protest against the death in police custody of Freddie Gray in BaltimoreBy Shannon Stapleton BALTIMORE (Reuters) - Mourners gathered at a Baltimore funeral home on Sunday to remember a 25-year-old black man who died a week ago while in police custody, an unexplained death that has brought thousands to the city's downtown to protest police violence. The wake for Freddie Gray on Sunday afternoon came the day after the largest demonstration yet since he died on April 19 and two weeks after a foot chase with patrol officers, his eventual arrest and his ride in a police transport van. Anthony Batts, the city's police commissioner, said on Friday that officers who detained Gray failed to give him timely medical attention for a spinal injury he suffered while in custody. The head of the Baltimore police union called that assertion premature and said it was apparently "politically driven." Gray is one of a growing number of black men who have died under questionable circumstances during police encounters in recent months.


Sun, 26 Apr 2015 09:45:48 -0400

A participant wears a rainbow tie during the annual Pride March on Christopher Street in Manhattan, New YorkBy Joan Biskupic WASHINGTON (Reuters) - The U.S. Supreme Court's arguments on Tuesday over same-sex marriage will cap more than two decades of litigation and a transformation in public attitudes. Based on the court's actions during the past two years, a sense of inevitability is in the air: That a majority is on the verge of declaring gay marriage legal nationwide. Justice Anthony Kennedy, the court's pivotal member on gay rights, has been marching in this direction with opinions dating to 1996. In his most recent gay rights decision for the court in 2013, rejecting a legal definition of marriage limited to a man and woman for purposes of federal benefits, Kennedy deplored that U.S. law for making gay marriages "unequal." That 5-4 decision did not address a constitutional right to same-sex marriage, but lower court judges interpreted the ruling as an endorsement of it and began invalidating state bans.


Sun, 26 Apr 2015 09:08:07 -0400

A police officer walks up the steps of the Supreme Court in WashingtonThe U.S. Supreme Court is set to hear arguments this week on whether a drug used in Oklahoma's lethal injection mix should be banned in a case that comes as a shortage of execution chemicals has sent some states scrambling for alternatives. The main question before the nine justices in the case brought by three death row inmates that will be heard on Wednesday is whether the use of the sedative midazolam violates constitutional protections against cruel and unusual punishment. The case does not address the constitutionality of the death penalty in general, but brings fresh attention to the debate over whether executions should continue in the United States. Opponents say midazolam is not approved for use in painful surgeries and should not be used in the death chamber because it cannot maintain a coma-like unconsciousness, potentially leaving inmates in intense pain from lethal injection drugs that halt breathing and stop the heart.